Water robotics at the Y - Energy Factor
Citizenship

Water robotics at the Y

Nov. 14, 2017

When the buzzer sounds, the students in Mrs. Cruz’s eighth-grade marine robotics class hop into action. Their mission? Compete against other teams to guide a remote-controlled underwater vehicle along the bottom of a pool to recover critical equipment—using only the robot’s camera to see.

Mrs. Cruz’s students attend the Scotlandville Pre-Engineering Magnet Academy in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The school is a STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and math)-focused middle school. Its curriculum offers courses such as game design, computer applications and multimedia production. The goal is to get students interested in science and math topics past middle school, planting the seed of encouragement to pursue these subjects further in high school and college.

Though some of the robots developed by Scotlandville’s students have started earning them ribbons, it took a little trial and error for the course to gain its footing. “The first day of our marine robotics competition three years ago was the first time our robot had ever been in the water,” Mrs. Cruz says. “As soon as it got wet, everything fell apart.”

Part of the issue was a lack of access to a pool where they could test their robot prior to competing. When leaders at the ExxonMobil YMCA learned the school needed access to water, they put in a plan to let them use the facility’s pool. ExxonMobil also provided grants so the students could take swimming lessons and water safety courses. “So now we get to test our robot in an actual pool, in the deep end, and we’re having more success because of that,” Cruz says.

But it takes more than a pool to develop underwater robots. It’s crucial for the students to strategize and work as a team, skills they learn throughout the school year leading up to the competition.

“The students absolutely must demonstrate teamwork,” Cruz says. “Building the robot is not easy, and when one student has an idea and somebody has a different idea, they have to learn to work together and test everyone’s ideas to see which one works best.” Cruz said it took her students about three months to build their last robot.

The applications of the technology they test at the YMCA pool go well beyond marine applications. Just to name a few, fields like archeology, aviation, oil and gas, and even space exploration all use remotely operated robots.

“The missions have relevance to real life,” Cruz explains. “During one, the kids had to maneuver the robot inside a shipwreck and identify some of the packages inside the ship. In another, they had to open a power source and replace a battery inside, so they had to install a gripper on the robot.”

It may be a few years before Scotlandville students start careers in robotics or engineering, but that hasn’t kept them from being exposed to some of the biggest names in remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). After last year’s competition, for instance, representatives from one local company were so impressed by the students’ enthusiasm, they asked one of Scotlandville’s teams to show their technology to some of their managers.

“We’re making the robotics courses relevant to the kids, letting them know that this is a viable pursuit,” Cruz says. “Developing these underwater robots is a first step that could inspire our next generation of engineers and innovators.”

Header image: Marine robotics students from the Scotlandville (La.) Pre-Engineering Magnet Academy

Tags: students, water robotics, YMCA, robots, Louisiana, Baton Rouge
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