What’s between you and the ground when the plane lands?

Science & technology

Commercial flight takes powerful jet engines and wings. It also requires powerful lubes.

Every year more than 3.7 billion passengers take to the air – which is a miracle when you think about how we humans used to get around. Cutting-edge materials and ever more fuel-efficient engines have made air travel as ubiquitous as automobile or train travel. Largely unseen, but just as critical, are the complex mechanics – including wing flaps, landing gear and flight controls – that support the aircraft’s operation. Supporting these mechanics are dedicated lubes and oils designed to withstand incredible temperature extremes, from as low as -94 °F (-70°C), when a plane reaches cruising altitude, to 248 °F (120°C), when it lands and pilots activate the brakes.

Sources:

Aviation Pros, Landing Gear Maintenance ‘Best Practices,’ October 16, 2008

FAA manual, Chapter 6: Flight Controls

ExxonMobil.com: Nose to tail schematic, Mobil Jet Oil II, Mobil Aviation Grease SHC 100

Tags:   air travelaircraft operationairplanecommercial flightinfographiclubricantsoils
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